Friday, December 15, 2017

JOE BIDEN ON ALABAMA SENATE RACE & DONALD TRUMP


Joe Biden Talks About Running For President





Former Vice President Joe Biden reacts to Alabama Senate race, discusses his late son’s battle with cancer and more.


On Alabama special election for Senate



Biden praised Doug Jones for his Senate win, saying "it makes me feel better about the nation": "This is not just about rejecting Trump."

On Pres. Trump's heated exchange with Sen. Gillibrand on Twitter 

Biden reacted to Trump's tweet about Gillibrand: "First of all I think it's disgusting..."



Joe Biden With Meghan McCain




Biden shares an emotional moment with Meghan McCain about her father’s diagnosis
Biden consoled Meghan McCain, whose father was diagnosed with the same cancer as Biden's late son Beau: "There is hope. And if anybody can make it, your dad [can]."


On how his family is coping with the loss of Beau


"Beau is my soul." Biden opened up about how his family is dealing with the loss of his late son: "Beau is missing but we've all decided to not talk about the loss as much [as] the inspiration he was to all of us."


Biden shared an incredible story of how Beau dealt with recovery from the car crash that killed his sister and mother, with his brother Hunter by his side: "That was Beau, Beau was always the guy, from the time he was a child — always giving."

 
Biden said: "I swear, guys, we are going to beat this damned disease. We really are."



Joe Biden On The View



On running for president


Biden on running in 2020: "If, in a year from now, if we're ready, and nobody has moved in that I think can do it, then I may very well do it."

 

On his relationship with President Obama


"All those memes are basically true!" Biden joked.


WATCH HERE


Courtesy Of: ABC / Disney

Thursday, December 14, 2017

LO BOSWORTH AND LENS CRAFTERS HOLIDAY NIGHT

Lo Bosworth



Lo Bosworth and LensCrafters host a holiday night-out to set sights on 2018 and celebrate eye-health in New York City the other day. 


POPCORN WITH PETER TRAVERS & MATT DAMON


Matt Damon On Popcorn With Peter Travers





During a taping of ABC News’ “Popcorn With Peter Travers,” Matt Damon opened up in a wide-ranging discussion about Harvey Weinstein and others inside and outside the entertainment world who have been publicly accused of sexual misconduct this year. His full interview will be available to watch beginning Wednesday, December 27, on ABCNews.com/popcorn, the ABC News apps and on streaming platforms including AppleTV, Roku, Xbox One and Hulu.






Matt Damon opens up about Harvey Weinstein, sexual harassment and confidentiality agreements.



Matt Damon addressed the sexual allegations against Harvey Weinstein, saying, “I knew I wouldn’t want him married to anyone close to me.”



“But that was the extent of what we knew. I mean, and that wasn’t a surprise to anybody. So when you hear Harvey this, Harvey that — I mean, look at the guy. Of course he’s a womanizer,” Damon continued in an interview for ABC News’ “Popcorn With Peter Travers.”



Damon, who stars in the upcoming film “Downsizing,” worked with Weinstein on his Oscar-winning film “Good Will Hunting,” which was produced by Weinstein’s production company Miramax.



In the past year, several women have publicly accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct. Weinstein has acknowledged inappropriate behavior but has denied any allegations of non-consensual sex.



“Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances,” his spokesman previously said.



In a wide-ranging discussion with Travers on Tuesday, Damon opened up about Weinstein and others inside and outside the entertainment world who have been publicly accused of sexual misconduct this year.



Read part of Damon’s conversation with Travers below.



Peter Travers: We live now in a different age, in a political age. There’s a lot of dissidence that goes on in the world that could affect you as an actor. We’re also in the age of people charged with sexual misconduct. This is everywhere. How do you react to that? Especially you, as the father of four girls.



Matt Damon: I think we’re in this watershed moment. I think it’s great. I think it’s wonderful that women are feeling empowered to tell their stories, and it’s totally necessary … I do believe that there’s a spectrum of behavior, right? And we’re going to have to figure — you know, there’s a difference between, you know, patting someone on the butt and rape or child molestation, right? Both of those behaviors need to be confronted and eradicated without question, but they shouldn’t be conflated, right? You know, we see somebody like Al Franken, right? — I personally would have preferred if they had an Ethics Committee investigation, you know what I mean? It’s like at what point — you know, we’re so energized to kind of get retribution, I think.



And we live in this culture of outrage and injury, and, you know, that we’re going to have to correct enough to kind of go, “Wait a minute. None of us came here perfect.” You know what I mean? … The Louis C.K. thing, I don’t know all the details. I don’t do deep dives on this, but I did see his statement, which kind of, which [was] arresting to me. When he came out and said, “I did this. I did these things. These women are all telling the truth.” And I just remember thinking, “Well, that’s the sign of somebody who — well, we can work with that” … Like, when I’m raising my kids, this constant personal responsibility is as important as anything else they learn before they go off in the world.



And the fear for me is that right now, we’re in this moment where at the moment — and I hope it doesn’t stay this way — the clearer signal to men and to younger people is, deny it. Because if you take responsibility for what you did, your life’s going to get ruined …



I mean, look, as I said, all of that behavior needs to be confronted, but there is a continuum. And on this end of the continuum where you have rape and child molestation or whatever, you know, that’s prison. Right? And that’s what needs to happen. OK? And then we can talk about rehabilitation and everything else. That’s criminal behavior, and it needs to be dealt with that way. The other stuff is just kind of shameful and gross, and I just think … I don’t know Louis C.K.. I’ve never met him. I’m a fan of his, but I don’t imagine he’s going to do those things again. You know what I mean? I imagine the price that he’s paid at this point is so beyond anything that he — I just think that we have to kind of start delineating between what these behaviors are.



PT: It’s harder, isn’t it, though, when you actually know someone who gets accused? We both know Harvey Weinstein. I’ve worked with him. But I didn’t see any of this.



MD: When you see Al Franken taking a picture putting his hands on that woman’s flak jacket and mugging for the camera, going like that, you know, that is just like a terrible joke, and it’s not funny. It’s wrong, and he shouldn’t have done that … But when you talk about Harvey and what he’s accused of, there are no pictures of that. He knew he was up to no good. There’s no witnesses. There’s no pictures. There’s no braggadocio … So they don’t belong in the same category.



PT: I think it becomes for all of us, too, that are in any way around it, even though we’re not seeing it, is, what’s our responsibility to make sure it doesn’t happen?



MD: A lot of people said, ‘Well, Harvey — everybody knew.’ As you were saying, that’s not true. Everybody knew what kind of guy he was in the sense that if you took a meeting with him, you knew that he was tough and he was a bully, and that was his reputation. And he enjoyed that reputation, because he was making the best movies out there …



[With regard to the rape allegations,] nobody who made movies for him knew … Any human being would have put a stop to that, no matter who he was. They would’ve said absolutely no. You know what I mean? … I knew I wouldn’t want him married to anyone close to me. But that was the extent of what we knew, you know? And that wasn’t a surprise to anybody. So when you hear Harvey this, Harvey that — I mean, look at the guy. Of course he’s a womanizer … I mean, I don’t hang out with him.


PT: But you can’t live his life for him. Or be responsible for his life.



MD: Right. So the question is, at what point does somebody’s behavior that you have a professional relationship with … away from the profession bother enough that you don’t want to work with them? For me, I’ve always kind of, you know, as long as nobody’s committing a crime — well, that’s your life, and you go live it. I don’t need to be spending time with you, away from my professional life, at least.


MUSEUM OF THE MOVING IMAGE & ANNETTE BENING

Annette Bening With Warren Beatty



Annette Bening and Warren Beatty were photographed at the Museum of the Moving Image Salute to Annette Bening at 583 Park Avenue yesterday in New York City.



DWIGHT YOAKAM IN CONCERT @ LAS VEGAS CHELSEA

Dwight Yoakam



Dwight Yoakam performed at The Chelsea at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada last night to a huge crowd.


Wednesday, December 13, 2017

NICK JONAS @ JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

Nick Jonas



Nick Jonas attended a New York special screening of 'Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle' at Dave & Buster's in Time Square tonight in New York City.



Tuesday, December 12, 2017

COLE SWINDELL IN CONCERT AT VEGAS COSMOPOLITAN

Cole Swindell



Cole Swindell performed at The Chelsea at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada the other night.


JEAN SHAFIROFF HOSTS 'THE POWER OF ART TO HEAL'

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NEW YORK HITS MIAMI

Photos By: Patrick McMullan
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Jean Shafiroff



Lee Fryd With Jonathan Fryd And Karen Fryd



Kevin Berlin & Tiffany Masters
Philanthropist Jean Shafiroff, with Nathan & Alan Lieberman of the South Beach Group Hotels, hosted the Power of Art to Heal at the Hotel Croydon Miami Beach during Art Basel Miami 2017. The event was inspired by Mrs. Shafiroff’s desire to add a philanthropic element to the week’s events. “We all know art heals,” says Mrs. Shafiroff, citing art therapy utilized to treat those in need such as children battered by domestic abuse, veterans and individuals from war-torn countries suffering from PTSD, and incarcerated individuals for whom describing trauma might not be possible. “Art therapy is a common method of treatment by charitable organizations,” says Mrs. Shafiroff.

Jean Shafiroff With Lee Fryd And Diane Lieberman



Notable attendees included: Jean Shafiroff, Alan Lieberman, Diane Lieberman, Lee Fryd, real estate developer Jonathan Fryd, Karen Fryd, Eric Demarchelier, Catherine Demarchelier, Catherine Rodstein, Missy Hargraves, Cydni Duran, Joe Swedroe, Jack Acoco, Ruth Miller, Joyce Moore, Lisa Konsker, Randi Schatz, Sir Ivan Wilzig, Svetlana Nevodtchikova, Steve Knobel, Nicole Noonan, Marie-Claire Gladstone, Kevin Berlin, Tiffany Masters, Mark Henkin, Julie Lamb and Barbara Agozzino.

Sir Ivan Wilzig With Svetlana Nevodtchikova


Steve Knobel And Nicole Noonan




Mrs. Shafiroff felt that Art Basel Miami was the perfect event to draw attention to the role art can play in healing, and to bring the issue to the forefront of the minds of the influential art dealers, artists, exhibitors, and attendees. Mrs. Shafiroff suggested exploring how future art fairs might contribute in some way to local charities in the Miami area. In honor of the event, Mrs. Shafiroff will make a donation The South Florida Youth Foundation, founded and directed by Karen Fryd.



About The South Florida Youth Foundation:



The South Florida Youth Foundation (SFYF) began by providing educational supplies to the neediest schools in Miami’s inner-city. This engagement grew by building relationships with the City of Miami Police Department and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Through concerned teachers and officers, the organization’s director, Karen Fryd, has been able to understand and engage with the poorest pockets of poverty. This has enabled an involvement for twenty years to directly address challenged situations in a grass-roots manner and getting quick results.



Projects have included: funding programs for disabled children, school supply drives, tickets to the arts, providing food for senior citizens, programs to incentivize better grades in school, assisting youth in attending college, programs to assist foster children, planting gardens, sponsoring music programs, prom programs, helping to create “The Shop” (a store where everything is free for students), opening a school library, and assisting in direct needs such as helping with electric bills and paying for hotels for families as they await placement in shelters, among others. All money donated to the SFYF goes directly to needs; not one dollar is spent on overhead.



The mission of The South Florida Youth Foundation: To help children achieve their fullest potential through education and to help break the cycle of poverty.



About Jean Shafiroff:



Jean Shafiroff, philanthropist, humanitarian, and author of Successful Philanthropy: How to Make a Life by What You Give, is considered to be at the vanguard of a new movement of modern philanthropists. Jean's philanthropy goes beyond financial contributions and includes the gifts of extensive time and knowledge. Through her work she encourages and seeks to empower all individuals to become philanthropists so that they can build the fulfillment of giving into their lives.



A volunteer fundraiser, leader and spokesperson for several charitable causes, the spectrum of Jean’s philanthropic work includes improving the lives of underserved populations, women’s rights and well-being, health care, animal welfare and resources for children in need, in addition to other causes. Jean serves on the boards of New York City Mission Society, New York Women’s Foundation, French Heritage Society, Couture Council (Museum of the Fashion Institute of Technology), Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (20+ years), Southampton Animal Shelter Honorary Board, Southampton Bath & Tennis Club’s Charitable Foundation and Global Strays. Recently Jean became an Ambassador for the American Humane Society. Widely recognized for her philanthropic work, Jean has been recognized and featured in numerous publications, including The Wall Street Journal, Gotham Magazine, The New York Times, New York Social Diary, Avenue, Hamptons Magazine, and The Huffington Post, among others.



Jean holds an MBA from the Graduate School of Business at Columbia University and a BS in physical therapy from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
For more information about Jean Shafiroff, please visit: www.jeanshafiroff.com


F: jean.shafiroff | T: @JeanShafiroff | I: @JeanShafiroff

THE VIEW TOPICS: TERROR ATTACK AND ROY MOORE


Terror Attack On The View



Hot Topics: Terror Attack In NYC


"New York does an incredible job of protecting our subways and our buses," Sunny Hostin said. "Hats off for [the] men and women that protect us."



Hot Topics: Are Alabama voters set on Roy Moore?



Meghan McCain said many Alabama conservative voters standing behind the embattled Senate candidate are determined to "vote conservative": "This is exactly what I heard during the last [presidential] election!"



"I think they have to justify it by saying, 'These people must've been paid or they're lying!' because I think to put your head down at night and be okay with what he did and vote for him is very difficult," Sara Haines said.


 Courtesy Of: ABC / Disney


Monday, December 11, 2017