Showing posts with label BOTOX ANGELS. Show all posts
Showing posts with label BOTOX ANGELS. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

"BOTOX ANGELS" FOR GAY PRIDE WEEKEND IN NEW YORK

Botox Angels



NEW YORK -- From Dood Paard ("Dead Horse") Theatre in Amsterdam comes "Botox Angels," a play about militant female sexuality which is abundant in sultry dialogue, jealousy and emotional violence. Three clownish lesbian characters, named Swift, Cocky and Deedee, negotiate shifting power relationships, juggle dildos and fake breasts, play dress-up games and cross swords about men, breast reductions, philosphy versus banality and emotion versus rationality. Written by Rob de Graaf, translated into English by Paul Evans, it is performed by Ellen Goemans, Janneke Remmers and Manja Topper, all from Holland. La MaMa presents the work's American premiere June 25 to 28, coinciding with Gay Pride Weekend.




"Botox Angels" gets a unique style from the rough mind games among its three protagonists and a tactical/emotional directness that is characteristic of the Dutch. Its characters are women for whom being lesbian is, at least partially, a political choice. They don't want to hide their beauty or their sexuality and they want to be seen as attractive adult girls. The title appropriates the name of a cosmetic surgery drug to suggest women's longing to inspire desire perpetually. For Swift, Cocky and Deedee, for whom sex is a very aggressive game, Botox might also be a warrior's creed: even if they are dykes, they still can be as beautiful and attractive as a magazine cover model. Imagine "Mean Girls" on steroids with middle-aged lesbian clowns.




The play opens with a three-way orgy in which Deedee, the outsider, complains to Cocky, the Queen Bee and Swift, the Wannabe, of being excluded. The scene pivots into a mock interview in which their urges are intellectualized into thoughtful dialogues about social forces, giant emotions, philosophical constructs and feminism with a great big "F." Throughout the rest of the play, the cast alternates between playing Swift, Cocky and Deedee and playing a trio of more realistic characters bearing the actresses' own names. This adds a certain transparency to the performance. Manja, Ellen and Janneke may be real people, but their so-called "real questions" are just as fake as any dialogue between two clowns, so the person being interviewed probably resembles her clown character more than anything she is like in real life. The dikes are breaking for these dykes and a tide of feminism is going to wash over all of us. As they wrangle about the place of women in society, and how to escape it, we learn that semen is poison to Cocky and Deedee, but Swift misses a man between her legs once in a while. Their trenchant discussions on female sexuality bring us up front and personal with just about everything about these Botox Angels, who are very tough women, as is their comedy.




Along the way, the actresses re-enact some famous performances by feminist performers: "Semiotics of the Kitchen" by Martha Rosler, "Artist must be Beautiful" by Marina Abramovic and "Cut Piece" by Yoko Ono.